Note: Lynda.com is a well developed, online training resource available to UC Berkeley staff by logging in with your Berkeley email address. In collaboration Transition Services, the Career Development Program for staff and UC Recruiting have partnered to review and suggest videos listed in the Support Videos sections below.

Networking Rules!

According to recent surveys, 80-85% of jobs are found through networking. (Lou Adler, LinkedIn Group).  Networking is really about connecting with people. With all of our great online communication tools, personal interactions are still the most powerful. Getting a referral for a job opening from someone who’s already working with the company could give you pretty impressive odds. Only 7% of job applicants get this kind of referral, yet referrals make up 40% of new hires. Clearly, networking isn’t just one potential route to finding a new job - in fact; it is the most effective path (CareerNews, Gina Belli). Consider the Pareto rule to manage your time:  80% outreach and 20% online search.

Professional networking is about making contacts and building relationships that can lead to jobs or other work-related opportunities. Thoughtful networking provides a focused way to talk to people about your job search. It is an essential component of any successful job search, requires clairity about your employment goals and strategic planning.

Successful job search is a result of a proactive, targeted strategy and a supportive network that caninclude  online connections, professionalpeers and personal contacts. The information in the related Lynda.com videos and the Staff Career Development workshops offer valuable tips on this process. We highly recommend the use of multiple resources in your job search. 


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Interviewing: Prep and Practice

Studies show that the job interview is over 90% non-verbal communication. A confident attitude, good eye-contact and a strong handshake speak volumes. Some points to remember:

  • Enthusiasm is good.
  • Listening is more important than talking. Make sure you hear the entire question so that you can answer it fully.
  • Give answers that relate to the requirements of the job.
  • Don’t volunteer more information than is asked by the interviewer.
  • Be prepared to answer questions with related examples of your experience or education. 
  • Do have questions to ask. This is your opportunity to find out if this job is right for you.
  • Dress appropriately for the interview.

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