How do I set goals?

  • Meet with your employee.
  • Identify and agree on major pieces of the job.
  • Use that list to determine performance for the year.
  • Start the next period by identifying the major pieces of the job, what success looks like, and how that might be measured.

What are the components of a goal?

Each goal will represent a major portion of the job, with a statement of what success looks like (meeting the manager’s expectations). Ideally, goals would include specific, measurable, realistic and time bound elements (SMART). Visit the HR tips on SMART goal writing.

What happened to the competencies?

We heard from many of you that the requirement to assess all staff along each individual competency was burdensome and not always useful.  Based on your feedback, we have shifted the focus of the PPR process to goal setting. By aligning individual performance goals with your organization’s strategic priorities, you are helping your staff actively engage in moving your unit toward its operational objectives.

The competencies are still important to managing your employees, because they support how the goal was accomplished. You will likely still use them in coaching your staff toward improved performance.  In doing so, you may find The Behavioral Anchors to be a useful resource.

Will there be training on goal setting for Managers and Supervisors?

Yes! Our KEYS class, ‘Communicating Goals and Expectations,’ provides detailed support on how to set goals. This program is offered twice a year based on the timing of the performance cycle (sign-up on blu). There is a online course (sign-up on blu) titled "UC Setting Expectations and Individual Performance Goals." Additionally, Talent + Organizational Performance (TOP) offers training for work teams upon request. Check out our Training resources for more information.

What happened to the development planning?

It’s still part of the process. When you discuss goals with your staff at the beginning of the cycle, it will be particularly important to include a discussion of success measures - i.e., how you will both know that the goal has been met.  As part of that conversation, together you should identify needed knowledge, skills, or abilities that will enable the employee to achieve the goal.  The discussion may result in an agreed upon Individual Development Plan, which you can complete as you have in the past (though it is no longer linked to the PPR form).

Alternatively, for some employees you may want to include a professional development goal as one of the 3-5 annual goals you establish at the beginning of the PPR cycle.

What do I do if I’ve supervised someone for less than a year?

You would review their performance for that period of time that you supervised them. The goals will be those you established for the employee during her/his onboarding process.

How do I use this form for very transactional jobs?

Goals can be either transaction based (e.g., produce 8 widgets each week) or strategic (e.g., redesign the production process so that the team can increase widget production by 10%)

Do we use this form to evaluate staff during their probation period?

Yes, the same form should be used for both career and contract employees during the annual review, and for probationary employees at any point in their probation cycle, as well as the end of the probationary period.

Why is there no section for evaluating responsibilities?

Goals should cover the broad areas of responsibility for a particular role, written as outcomes or results.