When is a reclassification effective, if approved?

The first of the month following receipt of all necessary documentation to the Compensation department in central Human Resources

What is the difference between a "promotion" and an "upward reclassification?"

A promotion involves movement from one position to a different position with a higher salary range midpoint through a competitive recruitment process. An upward reclassification involves a change in the functions of a position, which results in the assignment of an employee’s current position to a new payroll title with a higher salary range midpoint. A reclassified employee retains the majority (50% or more) of the prior functions and assumes additional functions as well.

What is the difference between a Manager 3 and Manager 4?

Positions at the Manager 4 (M4) level serve as the senior manager overseeing a large organization with multiple departments. They identify objectives and direct critical programs with major constituencies across campus. Very few positions on campus meet the M4 criteria. In contrast, a M3 position leads a critical function on campus, typically managing multiple subordinate organizations with different levels of Managers 1 and 2, Supervisors, professionals and other staff.

What is the difference between a Manager 2 and Manager 3?

Positions at the Manager (M3) level lead a critical function on campus, typically managing multiple subordinate organizations with different levels of Managers 1 and 2, supervisors, professionals and other staff. In contrast, a M2 position has responsibility for managing a department though subordinate managers, supervisors and professionals, serves as a consultant to senior management, has significant responsibility to achieve broadly stated goals for the department, identifies objectives, directs programs, and develops overall departmental strategies and policies.

What's the difference between a supervisor and a manager?

Specific differences are described by the generic scope of each supervisory and managerial level. Another way to look at it is that a manager is responsible for making significant decisions on what the unit does: its purpose, functions and role, and for making commitments and decisions that require the expenditure of significant unit resources. Managers have a significant, external focus (to the world outside the unit), whereas a supervisor has a more internal focused responsibility for implementing the manager’s decisions through the work of subordinate employees. Once a decision is made on what to do, supervisors have a significant role in deciding how to do it; how to achieve the objective established by the manager. Supervisors often perform the same kind of work that the subordinates do; managers do not do the daily work of the unit as a regular part of their work, they may do it more on an exception basis or in resolving the most difficult problems facing the unit.

What is the difference between a Manager 1 and Manager 2?

Positions at the Manager 2 (M2) level have responsibility for managing a department though subordinate managers. In contrast, a Manager (M1) level position is the primary manager of a unit or department and does not manage subordinate managers. This is a difficult concept to apply consistently given the lack of hierarchy in many departments on campus, and great care is taken to ensure employees were not unfairly disadvantaged based on department. The M2 level definition includes those who oversee one or more managers or multiple supervisors and professionals. The review process also consistently applies other components of generic scope –positions  at the M2 level need to document in the job description how the incumbent would serve as a consultant to senior management, have significant responsibility to achieve broadly stated goals for the department, identify objectives, direct programs, and develop overall departmental strategies and policies

What's the difference between a Supervisor 1 and Supervisor 2?

The key differences between Supervisor 1 (S1) and Supervisor 2 (S2) are defined by the generic scope. An S1 provides immediate supervision to a unit or group of operational or technical employees, whereas an S2 provides supervision and guidance to a group of professionals or skilled operational and technical employees.

What is the difference between a Manager/Supervisor and a Professional?

The Supervisory and Managerial category describes positions that exercise independent judgment in determining the distribution of work of at least 2 FTEs, and make decisions or recommendations about 3 or more of the following: hiring decisions, performance ratings, merit increases, promotional opportunities, reclassification requests, written warnings, suspensions, disciplinary actions, and/or resolution of grievances or complaints. Each individual job description is reviewed against this definition, and if the customized job content provided by the manager for custom scope, key responsibilities, problem solving and supervision (including organizational chart) does not support the definition of a supervisor or manager job standard, the position will subsequently be approved for a professional job title. Professionals may achieve and be responsible for many of the same functional responsibilities as a manager or supervisor, but achieve results through their own, personally-performed duties, rather than through the efforts of direct reports. 

Specific differences between manager and supervisor are described by the generic scope of each supervisory and managerial level.

Another way to look at it is that a manager is responsible for making significant decisions on what the unit does: its purpose, functions and role, and for making commitments and decisions that require the expenditure of significant unit resources. Managers have a significant, external focus (to the world outside the unit), whereas a supervisor has a more internal focused responsibility for implementing the manager’s decisions through the work of subordinate employees. Once a decision is made on what to do, supervisors have a significant role in deciding how to do it; how to achieve the objective established by the manager. Supervisors often perform the same kind of work that the subordinates do; managers do not do the daily work of the unit as a regular part of their work, they may do it more on an exception basis or in resolving the most difficult problems facing the unit.

What are the differences between the Professional 4 and the Professional 5 levels?

The generic scope for a professional 5 describes a position that is a recognized campus expert with significant impact and influence on campus policy and program development. Professional positions at this level regularly lead projects of critical importance to the overall campus. Very few positions on campus are at the Professional 5 level.

In contrast, professional 4 positions regularly serve as a technical leader to their department/campus community, perform duties requiring specialized expertise, and frequently analyze or resolve issues that are unique and without precedent.

If the job description submitted provides very limited customized content that supports the level 5 scope, the Compensation Unit can’t assume the employee is performing a professional level 5 position.

What are the differences between the Professional 3 and the Professional 4 levels?

The generic scope for a professional 4 describes a position that regularly serves as a technical leader to their department/campus community, performs duties requiring specialized expertise, and frequently analyzes or resolves issues that are unique and without precedent.

The generic scope for an experienced professional 3 describes a position requiring full understanding of the professional field, the ability to apply theory and put it into practice resolving problems of diverse scope and complexity, and broad job knowledge. If the job description submitted provides very limited customized content (i.e., problem solving examples don’t align with professional level 4 key responsibilities or scope) the Compensation Unit can’t assume the position is performing at a professional level 4.

Length of service, while providing employees and the campus with a wealth of institutional knowledge, does not by itself determine the level of responsibility required for the position. Length of service, as well as experience on committees or special projects outside of the scope of the primary job responsibilities, are helpful for preparing the individual for future career opportunities but also do not define the scope or level of the current position. 

What are the differences between the Professional 2 and the Professional 3 levels?

The generic scope for an experienced professional 3 describes a position requiring full understanding of the professional field, the ability to apply theory and put it into practice, resolving problems of diverse scope and complexity, and broad job knowledge.

A P2 position typically applies acquired professional knowledge and skills to complete tasks of moderate scope and complexity, and exercises judgment within defined guidelines or practices to determine appropriate action. 

If the job description submitted at a P3 level provides very limited customized content in custom scope, key responsibilities or problem solving that support the level 3 scope, the Compensation Unit can’t assume the employee is performing at a professional level 3 and would change the title to a P2.

How does the performance evaluation form include information from the job description?

Sometime in the future, key responsibilities from the job description will be copied into the performance evaluation form. Until that additional functionality is available, supervisors/managers will need to copy the content from the description into the performance evaluation form manually. In this manner, there is a direct link between the job description and the performance expectations of the employee performing that job

How much detail is required on the job description? Will the generic job standard suffice with very little customization?

A job description for review should provide a sentence or two for each applicable key responsibility to explain or customize that responsibility for an individual position. Also, bullet points that expand using examples on specific responsibilities for the incumbent are helpful. We also ask for 2 -3 examples for each of the problem solving sections. The problem solving examples should support the decisions expected of the category and level (i.e., Professional 4: decision making examples aligned with a technical leader demonstrating specialized expertise and resolution of unique issues; Manager 3: managerial decisions demonstrating oversight of subordinate organizations through different levels of managers, supervisors, and professionals.) See Categories and Levels for definitions of the job levels.

It is especially important to provide an accurate and true representation of an individual’s job duties because what is described in the job description will be the basis for review on the performance appraisal form. In other words, since an employee’s performance expectations will be based on their job description, the description needs to accurately define the job.